Sex Ed and the City

Text Message

Text Message from New York Anti-Teen Pregnancy Campaign

“What should you say to a guy if he says: ‘I don’t like wearing a condom’? Text your reply.”

The text was just one of many that popped up on my screen in what felt like the most unfortunate times—including at church on Easter Sunday—as I clutched my screen hoping those nearby couldn’t see the messages about birth control, baby daddies, STDs, condoms, or Plan B.

In the wake of the highly criticized New York anti-teen pregnancy campaign, I signed up to receive texts from them about teenage pregnancy. The messages present straightforward facts about sex. They tell teens that “pulling out” is not an effective way to prevent pregnancy. They explain how to respond to a boyfriend who doesn’t like wearing a condom. Tell him: “Wear one or we’re not having sex,” the message encourages.

The campaign supports the use of Plan B, reminding teens to take it if the condom breaks or if no protection was used at all. The texts discourage teen pregnancy by reminding them that parents spend more on diapers per month than they spend on shoes; they will be responsible for child support until their child is 21 (and their driver’s licenses will be taken away if they get behind on payments).

Initially, I have to applaud New York on trying to reach text-crazed teens—that last year were said to send an average of 60 texts per day—through such an accessible, familiar medium. A recent study found that hyper-texting teens, defined as those who send more than 120 texts per day, were more likely to use have had sex and used drugs.

However, McLuhan’s famous “the medium is the message” rings true here, meaning the way through which the message is communicated can hold more value than the message itself. Therefore, the texts containing vital information may not seen as important, instead they come across as disposable, delete-able, and easily ignored—because of the medium by which they are communicated.

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